C-Reactive Protein (CRP)

Human C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the so-called acute phase proteins. CRP is produced in liver and its concentration in blood increases rapidly as a response to inflammation.

For the development of CRP immunoassays we offer monoclonal antibodies and a recombinant human CRP antigen. In addition, we have CRP-depleted serum which can be used for CRP specific immunoassay development.

CRP is a 224-residue protein with a monomer molecular mass of approximately 25 kDa and pI 6.4. It belongs to pentraxins, an evolutionally conserved family of proteins characterized by calcium dependent ligand binding and radial symmetry of five monomers forming a ring around central pore. The total mass of the CRP pentamer is approximately 120 kDa.
CRP has been shown to participate in inflammatory as well as innate immunity processes. The level of CRP in the blood of healthy people is usually low but in infections caused by bacteria the concentration of CRP can quite easily increase tenfold. In contrast, infections of viral origin usually result in just a moderate increase in the level of CRP.
For the development of CRP immunoassays we offer monoclonal antibodies and a recombinant human CRP antigen. In addition, we have CRP-depleted serum which can be used for CRP specific immunoassay development.

Learn more:
CRP TechNotes
Cat# 4C28cc: C-reactive protein (CRP), antibody
Cat# 8CR8: C-reactive protein (CRP), human, recombinant



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