Serum Amyloid A (SAA)

Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a non-specific marker of inflammation. SAA1 and SAA2 are so-called acute phase isoforms synthesized in the liver. Their expression is increased in response to inflammation.

For the development of SAA immunoassays we offer monoclonal antibodies and a recombinant human SAA1 and SAA2 antigens.

SAA apolipoprotein family consists of three members that in human beings are coded by different genes: SAA1, SAA2, and SAA4. SAA1 and SAA2 are so-called acute phase isoforms. Although the biological function of SAA in inflammation is unclear. It has been suggested that SAA is involved in the recycling of cholesterol from damaged tissues.
SAA1 and SAA2 are synthesized in the liver and secreted to the blood. When in the blood, SAA proteins form complexes with high density lipoproteins (HDL). Published studies demonstrate that recombinant SAA exhibits significant proinflammatory activity by inducing the synthesis of several cytokines and promoting chemotaxis for monocytes and neutrophils in vitro. The concentration of SAA increases in response to inflammatory stimuli such as tissue injury, infection, or trauma. Similarly to C-reactive protein, SAA is a major acute phase protein in human beings.
For the development of SAA immunoassays we offer monoclonal antibodies and a recombinant human SAA1 and SAA2 antigens.

Learn more:
Human serum amyloid A (SAA) TechNotes

Cat# 4SA11: Serum amyloid A (SAA), antibody
Cat# 4VS4: Serum amyloid A (SAA), animal, antibody
Cat# 8SA1: Recombinant human serum amyloid A1 (SAA1)
Cat# 8SA2: Recombinant human serum amyloid A2 (SAA2)



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